Summer Somen Noodles (Cold Noodles Recipe) | Cooking with Dog

Summer Somen Noodles (Cold Noodles Recipe) | Cooking with Dog


Hi, I am Francis, the host of this show “Cooking with Dog.” First, let’s prepare the toppings. Trim off the caps of the okra and remove the firm skins between the cap and the pod. Scrub the okra with salt, removing the fuzz. Boil the okra in a pot for about 30 seconds. Remove and quickly cool the okra in a bowl of ice water to help retain its color. When cooled, remove the excess water with a paper towel. Finally, chop it into thin slices. Peel the nagaimo yam, which is rich in nutrients and also used in traditional Chinese medicine. Slice off three, quarter-inch slices. Line them up on a cutting board, cover with plastic wrap and pound the nagaimo with a surikogi pestle. Remove the stems of the cherry tomatoes and cut each into 4 wedges. Cut two slices about a quarter inch thick from the kamaboko fish cake and remove them from the wooden base. Cut them in half, making quarter moons. Combine the dashi soy sauce and cold water in a bowl and mix with a balloon whisk. And now, let’s cook the somen noodles. Boil a generous amount of water, spread the noodles in the pot and stir with chopsticks. Cooking time depends on the type of noodles so follow the instructions on the package. Drain the somen with a mesh strainer and then thoroughly rinse the noodles under cold running water or in a bowl as shown. Next, allow the somen to cool in a bowl of ice water. When cooled, drain them with a mesh strainer again and thoroughly squeeze out the excess water with your hands. Loosely place the somen into a shallow bowl. Top with the kamaboko fish cake, okra, tomatoes and pounded nagaimo yam. This hikiwari-natto, crushed fermented soybeans contains a lot of beneficial bacteria and nutrients. You should definitely try it out! Sprinkle on the toasted white sesame seeds and chopped spring onion leaves. Finally, pour the dashi sauce onto the somen noodles. To achieve a more refreshing taste, you can add pounded umeboshi, pickled plum to the sauce. If you want to spice up this recipe, adding kimchi, fermented Korean vegetables is a great idea. Good luck in the kitchen!

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    ForestofTooMuchFood

    It's funny watching and seeing the different hair styles she has if you have a Cooking with a Dog watching binge.

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    Reshipu310

    Okaerinasa~i おかえりぃ♪(*^-^)(*^-^)(*^-^)  
    新作も全部拝見しました。 いつ見てもホッとします。
    お身体はもう万全ですか? 無理をなさらないように、でも、沢山の新作待ってます♪(* ̄▽ ̄*)ノ”

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    Nicole Kiser

    I was interested until you put natto in this dish. I've had that stuff before, it's nasty! You can always tell when someone's eating it too, it leaves a unique stench in a room. 🙁

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    Megan Uphoff

    who in the world would dislike these videos? I love how everything looks so straight forward. It makes me want to try!

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    mavisthepanda

    Please reply. What does it taste and smell like? I hear good things about the benefits of it, which naturally I can appreciate. But not so great things about the smell most of all and I'd like to know about the taste.

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    Nicole Kiser

    I was never able to eat it… the smell was just so horrible I could never bring myself to put it any closer to my face. It's like putting rotting liquified chicken to your face–not that it smells like rotting chicken, I just respond the same way to it AS rotting chicken.

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    PuffleHuff

    I know what you mean. She lost me at okra. The dish sounds perfectly good, but it's a shame she added okra, natto, and yam. Perhaps I can add something else! It's still worth a try.

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    jesuslove1991

    Because this is not how some people cook. Duh. If I ate something like this my stomach will hurt me, and I'll be shitting all day.

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    Paintplayer1

    Lol dude it's noodles and vegetables. If your stomach can't handle that, you better see a doctor.

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    Foodfangirl

    I'm pretty sure you don't have to add the natto. As for okra, I'm weird because while a lot of people like fried okra, I prefer mine boiled. Sure it's slimy but it's an acquired taste.

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    TeddysCooking

    This dish has okra, nagaimo, and natto because Japanese people believe these sticky ingredients can help people cool down on a hot summer day.

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    AutumnAlchemist

    I have heard that Natto, while good in beneficial bacteria, does have a very strong smell. I have never tried it before, but I want to figure out what is truth and what is not. Otherwise, I have nothing wrong with any of this, as it does look delicious!

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    miyubail

    Thank you chef san. The next time I go back to Japan(Nagoya) I definitely will make this. I become Sutamina Kire when hot in summer. I wish I could comment in Japanese, I'm still learning my brand new PC, it's Windows 8.1 and is over my head….

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    Taylor C

    That looks really good chef-san!! :3 You must seriously must be a good cook because every time I watch one of your videos,… I start to get hungry because your cooking looks SO delicious!!!!!!!

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    Lysis Moonlight

    Made this for lunch, it was delicious but I had to substitute some of the ingredients as I couldn't find them where I live (France). I used kanikama instead of kamaboko, grated young onion instead of nagaimo yam and regular natto instead of crushed natto. For dashi soy sauce I just made my own using 1 tbsp soy sauce, 1tbsp mirin, 1/4 tsp dashi powder and 25 ml water. I don't know if it tastes the same as premade dashi soy sauce but it was good! So yeah not the original dish but you still have some of the flavors.

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    Mokomboso

    Making myself some yummy somen as we speak. Instead of the usual ham or fishcake I've just thin slices of "hotpot" lamb that I cooked in a frying pan.

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    Karina Mami Sek

    Please, what is the name of the Japanese chef?
    Thank you for your attention, now.
    I love your technique.

    日本人シェフの名前は どなたですか、おしえてください?
    どーも!
    🙂

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